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Category Archives: Health Outcomes for an Aging Society

Predicting the Economic Impact of Changes to Population Health

So much of health care policy is decided by the science of the educated guess, with “what-if” forecasts at the heart of any analysis. (more…)

A Medication Lock-In Program May Not Be the Easy Solution to the Opioid Abuse Epidemic That Congress Thinks It Is

According to the CDC, in 2010 enough opioid pain relievers were sold to (more…)

The Baby Boomers Will Shift the Health Status of the Medicare Population

A Typical Medicare Recipient in 2030

A new study by Schaeffer Center researchers Etienne Gaudette, Bryan Tysinger, and Dana Goldman predicts significant changes in the average future Medicare recipient. (more…)

For Vulnerable Populations, the Medicare Part D Doughnut Hole Disrupts Medication Adherence

During the annual Medicare Open Enrollment period, senior citizens (more…)

Four Evidence-Based Strategies to Improve Medicare

Medicare has undoubtedly helped millions of seniors and disabled adults receive health coverage since being signed into law in 1965.  Today, Medicare covers 55 million beneficiaries across the US. In the coming decades though, Medicare (more…)

Medicare’s Big Fat Problem, Fiscal and Otherwise

Co-Authors: Dana Goldman, Bryan Tysinger, and Alwyn Cassil

You can’t draw a straight line between growing Medicare spending and expanding American waistlines. But policymakers would be wise to keep both in mind as they ponder how to pay for the health care of 75-million-plus baby boomers who likely will live longer in worse health thanks to rising rates of chronic conditions, (more…)

Biomedical Research in the Age of Preventive Medicine

“Moonshot” was the word Google CEO Larry Page used to describe his newest venture, Calico–a biotech startup focused on the challenge of aging and age-associated pathology. In fact, medical therapies to delay aging are increasingly feasible, and, as shown by our study in Health Affairs, could achieve a far greater return on investment than comparable advances in the treatment of specific diseases. (more…)

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