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About Neeraj Sood

Neeraj Sood, Ph.D., is Director of Research at the Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics and Associate Professor at the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy at the University of Southern California. More information about Neeraj can be found here.

Articles

U.S. Funding for HIV Treatment Associated with Employment Gains in sub-Saharan Africa

By: Jeremy Barofsky, Neeraj Sood, Zachary Wagner

Since 2003, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has provided billions of US tax dollars to expand HIV treatment, care, and prevention programs, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. According to the Institute of Medicine, PEPFAR’s $54 billion authorization from 2003-2013 constitutes the “largest global health initiative focused (more…)

The US Hospital System May Be Outperforming Expectations

In a new Health Affairs article released in February, Schaeffer Center researchers provide evidence that hospital productivity increased from 2002 to 2011, suggesting that the US health care system could be performing better than many believe.  John Romley, Research Assistant Professor at the USC Schaeffer Center for Health (more…)

Follow The Money: The Flow Of Funds In The Pharmaceutical Distribution System

Any government intervention to control drug pricing should be predicated on a clear understanding of the economic forces that drive price increases, and the parties responsible for them. (more…)

A Good Deal For Eliminating Hepatitis C: Saving Money And Lives

Hepatitis C kills more than 20,000 Americans each year. A recent consensus committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine proposed a novel strategy to improve access to hepatitis C medicines. (more…)

What Medicare Advantage’s Success in Delivering Post-Acute Care Means for Medicare Reform

A recent study found Medicare Fee-for-Service and Medicare Advantage patients have hospitalization and post-hospitalization costs and outcomes that are generally different. How do these outcomes translate to policy recommendations? (more…)

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